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Poster: AshesRising Date: Nov 25, 2007 1:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: "Musicophilia:" (non-fiction) - you may enjoy this

Hello:
"Musicophilia," by Dr. Oliver Sacks (2007). I am incapable of providing an adequate summary so here are some facts: real-life stories that include music, lightning-bolts, "blue-lights," hallucinations and the transformative nature of music. ...I got a hunch there may be one or two of you that would like to at least read the first chapter:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/28/books/review/1028-1st-sacks.html?pagewanted=all

I know you can do your own search for reviews so I will sign-off now. Later.

Just a little(?) nervous from the fall,
--- AshesRising

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Poster: Toadsmoker Date: Nov 25, 2007 8:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 'Musicophilia:' (non-fiction) - you may enjoy this

.....lol, was a bit worried there at first. Think the author needs few more volts or a Spike Jones cd.

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Poster: Jerrob Hungar Date: Nov 25, 2007 10:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 'Musicophilia:' (non-fiction) - you may enjoy this

Ashes: Amazing stories. (He was certainly lucky not to be killed. Standing in thunderstorms cannot yet be recommended as a new answer to the old question of how to get to Carnegie Hall.):¬)

"Music uniquely among the arts is both completely abstract and profoundly emotional. It has no power to represent anything particular or external, but it has a unique power to express inner states or feelings. Music can pierce the heart directly. It needs no mediation. One does not have to know anything about Dido and Aeneas to be moved by her lament for him. [Henry Purcell’s opera, from 1689] Everyone who has ever lost someone knows what Dido is expressing. And there is, finally, a deep and mysterious paradox here, for while such music makes one experience pain and grief more intensely, it brings solace and consolation at the same time."
Oliver Sacks

just swap Dido and Aeneas for China Doll.

Re Mr Cicoria and the stealie: a case of life imitating art?
:¬)